The Diary

16
Sep

Powell “Temporary” Inflation

“Inflation at these levels is, of course, a cause for concern. But that concern is tempered by a number of factors that suggest that these elevated readings are likely to prove temporary.”

That what the Fedearl Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a speech last week to Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium which is sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

The key word there is the last word – temporary.

But the speech was for 21 minutes and mentioned inflation 71 times (here is the transcript of the speech).

If it’s really “temporary,” why mention it every 18 seconds?

We weren’t buying it.

But then we realized that he may truly mean inflation is temporary.

At least temporary in the government sense of the term.

We know of many “temporary” government policies and projects.

15
Sep

Political Theater

All of the politicians hemming and hawing about budgets and spending…

It’s all theater.

All of it.

And it could be the foundation of a major run in one of the most out of favor asset classes.

And the next big run will be set to kick off by September 27th.

3
Sep

Outlook for Tin

If you follow metals and mining on Twitter, you may have stumbled upon the hashtag #tinbaron, and asked yourself what is the big deal about a metal from antiquity? 

2
Sep

Betting Against Opioids: Investing in Healthcare vs Big Pharma

I’ve got a 91-year-old father who means the world to me.
And I’ve devoted this summer to spending some quality time with him. So I sublet my apartment in California and rented an Airbnb in the town of Bainbridge, Ohio, a few miles from where my dad lives.
I figured we’d spend the summer going on walks together… play a little golf… maybe even take a few mini-road trips.
None of that’s happened.
The reason?
Dad’s suffering from severe low back pain – everything he does hurts.
Now he can’t even leave the house without a walker.
Doctors haven’t been able to do much for him, other than prescribe painkillers and cortisone injections.
All that’s helped a little, but he’s still miserable.

2
Sep

The fly in the ointment of the EV revolution

I said it in my last article, and I’ll say it again…
Diesel-powered vehicles are on their last legs.
Governments are seeing to that.
As of the beginning of 2021, 31 cities, states and countries worldwide have diesel bans in place.
More are sure to follow.
The main reason – excessive NOx emissions from diesels are polluting our air, making people sick and causing deaths.

19
Aug

A Sleepy Profit Play On The Death of Diesel

His name was Phil Baker.
For 18 years, he worked as an engineer for Norfolk Southern Railroad in Georgia.
The pay was good…but there was a catch.
Black smoke from the train constantly flooded the crew cabins of the diesel trains he ran.

 He ended up dying of a rare head and neck cancer.

 A jury ruled all that exhaust caused it.

 —

Anthony Nigro was also exposed to diesel exhaust every day he worked.

 It came from buses he maintained for 28 years at the New York City Transit Authority.

 A Workman’s Compensation judge ruled that exposure was a major cause of his lung cancer.

 It took his life mere months after his retirement. 

There was also a mechanic for the Illinois Central Railroad who died of throat cancer…

 A machinist who died of multiple myeloma…

 And a railroad trackman who lost his life to gastric cancer…

19
Aug

The Disastrous Consequences of Plastic Pollution

The Disastrous Consequences of Plastic Pollution – and How to Invest in Alternative Materials
Dear Fellow Fed Up Investor,
Quick quiz…
What’s the world’s biggest problem?
Climate change? Inflation?

 Covid?

Political unrest?

 Bad as they all are, my vote goes to pollution.

 It’s hard to fathom just how polluted the world is – especially the “Undeveloped” World.

 I saw this first-hand during my travels through Asia some years ago.

30
Jul

Is Your Portfolio Ready For A 2000% Spike In Pandemic Cases?

The pandemic case count is ramping up in the U.S.

The markets are gearing up for a major spike.

Our analysis below shows how a 2000% spike in cases could be here in weeks.

And like it or not, a big part of the country could be enforcing mask mandates and lockdowns again soon.

But here’s the good news.

There’s a strong possibility — we’re thinking even probability — that there will be both a huge spike in cases and that life will continue on basically as normal while the U.S. economic engine chugs along.

Things could really go either way at this point.

That’s why we’re making this one simple move, which actually prepares us for either outcome — continued recovery or crushing lockdowns.

Here’s the setup.

29
Jul

Why India Will Have a Huge Impact on Gold Prices in 2021 and Beyond

I spent the entire year of 1993 backpacking through India.

Talk about culture shock – my senses were constantly under assault.

Beautiful women in vibrant saris…Pungent aromas of spice and incense…Bollywood music blaring from rooftops…

But what really stood out was the abject poverty.

For a week or so I stayed at a friend’s high-rise apartment in Bombay (which is now called Mumbai).

The morning after arriving, I awoke to discover that an encampment of about 50 families had sprouted up overnight across the street.

This, my host told me, happened all over the country every single day.

As you might imagine, I also encountered countless beggars during my time in India.

Of course, not everyone in India is poor.

In fact, the country now boasts 119 billionaires – that’s 110 more than there were in 2000.

And according to Oxfam, the country produces 70 new millionaires every day.

So it’s no surprise that the disparity between rich and poor in India is astounding (the top 10% of the country’s population accounts for 77% of its total wealth).

9
Jul

As China Stockpiles Copper Supplies – Who are America’s Copper Allies?

Copper is one of the most widely used industrial metals in the world because of its high ductility, malleability, thermal and electrical conductivity and resistance to corrosion.
And, if you’ve read The Diary before, you know we are very bullish on copper. Not only is it critical to the EV revolution, it’s also critical to other green energy infrastructure such as wind turbines and solar panels. Copper is also needed to build many of the infrastructure that is necessary to support a healthy economy, such as homes, power grids, plumbing systems, and broadband networks.
The reason we’re so bullish on copper is because, coupled with rising global demand, copper is in considerably short supply – especially in the wake of the pandemic, which saw many mining operations shut down and investment into new projects dry up.